Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti

Legal Analysis of UN Immunity in the Haiti Cholera Case

The United States recently filed an amicus brief in support of absolute immunity for the United Nations (UN) in our cholera case against the organization. This article outlines some major counterarguments to what the US posits in its brief, including the initial intentions behind UN immunity.

Part of the article is below. Click HERE for the full text.

How Broad is the UN’s Immunity? More on The Haiti Cholera Case

Kristen Boon, Opinio Juris

September 22, 2015

If you haven’t seen it yet, the US recently filed its amicus brief in the Haiti Cholera appeal – it is available here: Haiti US amicus 2nd Circ. Predictably, the brief makes the case for absolute external UN immunity, and advances largely the same arguments put forward in prior filings.

And yet, there are a number of powerful counterarguments to the position put forward by the US government.

  • At the time the Convention on Privileges and Immunities of the UN (CPIUN) was drafted, the whole field of privileges and immunities of IOs was largely “uncharted territory,” and founding States projected what immunities they thought the UN would need with little information from practice;
  • The legislative history of the CPIUN confirms that the biggest fear of UN founding states was the threat of a member state trying to control the UN, not classes of private plaintiffs bringing torts cases against the Organization;
  • Article 105 of the UN Charter limits the Organization’s immunities before national courts to what are functionally necessary, and under Article 103, the Charter trumps conflicting treaties, arguably including the broader language of the CPIUN.
  • Although settling claims might place a considerable financial burden on the Organization, the UN could purchase liability insurance to cover itself against large claims;
  • The concern that Troop Contributing Countries will be deterred from cooperating with the UN if it has anything less than absolute immunity has no empirical support. In fact, what appears to be of far more concern to TCCs is the expansion of “robust” peacekeeping missions in which peacekeepers have an offensive mandate.


Click HERE for the full text.

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