Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti

Does the U.S. really support “elections that reflect the will of the Haitian people”?

As Haiti’s current political crisis began to unfold, the United States continually tried to force fraudulent elections to continue despite broad popular disapproval. Now that the elections have been postponed in hopes of a more legitimate strategy, the State Department “reaffirms its support for credible, transparent, and secure elections that reflect the will of the Haitian people.” But has the State Department ever supported the will of the Haitian people? This article outlines U.S. intervention in Haiti over the past century, in ways that certainly did not support the Haitian people.

Part of the article is below. Click HERE for the full text.

Sure, Washington Has Always Supported Democracy in Haiti

Greg Grandin, The Nation

January 26, 2016

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“As in the past, the United States is taking great interest in how elections in Haiti are unfolding,” a State Department spokesperson announced a few days ago; “The United States reaffirms its support for credible, transparent, and secure elections that reflect the will of the Haitian people.” George Orwell couldn’t have said it better: “We’ve always been at war with Eastasia.” And we have always supported democracy in Haiti.

The remark was in response to the country’s current political crisis—a crisis largely created by Washington—that forced the postponement of a runoff presidential election. The first-round vote, last October, was so marred by fraud, corruption, and violence that all other candidates, save Washington’s favored and handpicked successor to the current president, Michel Martelly—Jovenel Moïse—were boycotting the second runoff round.

In other words, the runoff had only one candidate: Washington’s. For months, the Obama administration insisted that the runoff take place, working hard to discredit the fraud charges. The goal of the United States, the State Department said in a “Fact Sheet” updated just last week as street protests were gaining force, was “credible, inclusive, and legitimate elections that genuinely reflect the will of the Haitian people.”

 

Click HERE for the full text.

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