Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti

Recent Study from the Center for Migration Studies Shows That Ending TPS  Would Negatively Impact the U.S. Economy

Screen Shot 2017-08-01 at 11.02.11 PMAccording to a study published by Center for Migration Studies in New York, deporting people from TPS-designated countries would negatively negative impact the United States economy. The study also shows that more than 80% of the approximately 325,000 immigrants are tax payers working in crucial industries for the U.S. The United States could see a reduction in its GDP, ‘banks would see defaults in mortgages” and foster care would see cost increase due to thousands of orphans left behind by the immigrants. “It’s a lose-lose-lose option,” said Donald Kerwin, Executive Director of the Center for Migration Studies.

For more information on TPS extension, please visit our website

Read the full article HERE.

Study says doing away with immigration program would harm economy

 Rhina Guidos Catholic News Service

Citing the significant economic contributions of immigrants under a federal program known as Temporary Protected Status, a new study says ending the program — as some in the Trump administration have suggested — would negatively impact the U.S. economy.

Kevin Appleby, the center’s senior director of international migration policy, said if extensions for the migrants are not granted or the program is terminated, crucial industries would see a shortage of workers, banks would see defaults in mortgages, and government coffers would lose out on tax revenues and consumer spending.

“Let’s hope the financial industry realizes that,” he said.

Deporting TPS recipient parents also would create thousands of orphans in the country, which would increase foster care costs, place a burden on local and state governments, and alienate the children affected, said Appleby. He was one of three officials from the center who explained the report “Statistical and Demographic Profile of the U.S. Temporary Protected Status Populations From El Salvador, Honduras and Haiti” in a July 20 video conference.

Read the full article HERE.

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