Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti

Click HERE for links to over 70 editorials, resolutions, political letters, op-eds, petitions, and other support urging the President and DHS to create a Haitian Family Reunification Parole Program.

*If you’re looking for information on the Dominican Republic’s citizenship crisis, click HERE.*


IJDH’s immigration advocacy is built on three decades of leadership in ensuring a safe haven in the U.S. for Haiti’s persecuted.  We seek creation of a Haitian Family Reunification Parole Program to save lives, reunite families, expedite orderly migration and speed recovery by increasing the flow of remittances to loved ones in Haiti. The Haiti Asylum Information Project (HAIP), established in 2004, has provided asylum applicants from across Haiti’s political spectrum the expert testimony and country condition information they need to present strong cases. Our Stop Deportations Now Campaign, the platform for years-long Temporary Protected Status (TPS) advocacy in Congress, the media, and the streets led to the suspension of all non-criminal deportations to Haiti in early 2009 and facilitated the immediate grant of TPS to Haitians in the United States after Haiti’s January 12, 2010 earthquake.

Expediting Haitian Family Reunification

IJDH leads nationwide advocacy urging the Obama administration to create a Haitian Family Reunification Parole Program (FRPP).  Nearly 110,000 Haitians are beneficiaries of family-based immigrant visa petitions which the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has already approved but who remain on wait lists of up to more than 12 years in Haiti, where many may not survive.  A Cuban FRPP expedites family reunification for similarly-situated Cuban beneficiaries; IJDH has built extensive support and momentum for creation of a similar Haitian program.

Click HERE for links to letters, resolutions, editorials, reports, petitions and op-eds urging creation of a Haitian FRPP to save lives and speed Haiti’s recovery.

Temporary Protected Status (TPS)

On Jan­u­ary 21, 2010, after years of IJDH advo­cacy and a dev­as­tat­ing earth­quake nine days ear­lier, the Depart­ment of Home­land Secu­rity (DHS) des­ig­nated Haiti for Tem­po­rary Pro­tected Sta­tus (TPS) for 18 months. In May, 2011, DHS extended TPS for another 18 months to Jan­u­ary 22, 2013, and redes­ig­nated it to include Haitians who had arrived in the United States by Jan­u­ary 12, 2011, one year after the quake. On Octo­ber 1, 2012, DHS extended TPS for Haiti for another 18 months, to July 22, 2014.  Most recently, on March 3, 2014, DHS extended TPS for another 18 months, through January 22, 2016. As always, Haitians seek­ing TPS pro­tec­tion and work autho­riza­tion must apply indi­vid­u­ally, meet­ing eli­gi­bil­ity require­ments described by DHS’s United States Cit­i­zen­ship and Immi­gra­tion Ser­vices (USCIS).
TPS pro­tects most Haitians in the United States from depor­ta­tion to Haiti, and IJDH works with a broad range of advo­cates to trouble-shoot TPS imple­men­ta­tion issues as they arise.

Haitian Asylum Information Project (HAIP)

The Haitian Asylum Information Project (HAIP) is an online resource library for asylum applicants and their lawyers. It contains key documents, contact information, and model pleadings to facilitate the filing of successful Haitian asylum cases.
Click HERE to learn more about HAIP.

Stop Deportations Now Campaign

Click HERE to learn more about the campaign.

Take Action

Take action now for fair immigration policy toward Haitians. Make your voice heard by signing petitions, writing to or calling your representatives, and getting up-to-date information about Haitian immigration.

Contact IJDH

Institute for Justice & Democracy In Haiti
666 Dorchester Avenue
Boston, MA 02127

Telephone: (617) 652-0876
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