Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti

UN’s Disastrous Legacy in Haiti – Edwidge Danticat

The United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti, MINUSTAH, established in June of 2004, has finally come to an end after thirteen long years. MINUSTAH was established to create a “secure and stable environment” in Haiti, which was viewed as a threat to international peace and security in the region.” However, instead of pacifying the nation, MINUSTAH acted as “a continuous military operation in a country in which there was no war.” In addition to killing, injuring and raping Haitian citizens, United Nations peacekeepers also caused the cholera epidemic which has claimed thousands of Haitian lives. The UN has yet to alleviate the trauma it has caused Haiti. Meanwhile, the institution has replaced MINUSTAH with a smaller version, MINUJUSTH (United Nations Mission for Justice Support in Haiti), aimed at helping the Haitian government strengthen its institutions and police force. The evidence […]

Action Alert: Tell Congress to Support Senate’s $12M to Assist Cholera Victims in Haiti

Last week, the Senate Appropriations Committee approved $12 million for the United Nations’ trust fund to assist cholera victims. Though the Trump Administration opposes the funding, it will be delivered if we convince the House of Representatives to keep it in the final Appropriations Bill. There’s no better time to tell your Representative in Washington that HE/SHE should care about Haiti. Call your Rep today, tell HIM/HER to support the Senate Appropriations Committee $12 million to fund the U.N.’s  New Approach to Cholera in Haiti to prevent more Haitians dying from the disease. Let’s make justice happen, one phone call at a time.   Its easy! Here’s how: 1. Call your Rep’s line, or the switchboard (202) 224-3121, with your Rep’s name or your zip code. 2. Leave a voicemail message. Start with your name and city/state, so they know you […]

Haitian Government Seeks to Rebuild National Military

In the wake of the UN’s decision to withdraw its military peacekeepers from Haiti, the Haitian government is now faced with questions about what, if any, military force should replace them to avoid a security vacuum. Haiti’s national army has been disbanded for 22 years, and, for many Haitians, the thought of reconstituting an army brings back memories of the political repression and destabilization associated with the prior military regime. Thus, while many Haitians do support the idea, others fear it will quickly become politicized and thwart Haiti’s democratic progress. Part of the article is shown below. Click HERE for the original article. With End of UN Mission Ahead, Haiti Seeks to Revive Its Military Voice of America (Associated Press) April 19, 2017 GRESSIER, HAITI — Their heads held high and chests puffed out, nearly 100 Haitian men in camouflage fatigues do jumping jacks or march around […]

UN Plans to Withdraw from Haiti Following Signs of Political Stability

The international community is hailing Haiti’s recent election as a sign that it is time for the United Nations to withdraw its peacekeeping force in Haiti, MINUSTAH. Leaders are concerned, however, about the Haitian National Police (PNH) remaining apolitical after the MINUSTAH drawdown because the last time the UN withdrew from Haiti, PNH became politicized and eventually collapsed. The current Haitian administration has mentioned its interest in creating a national army but UN Secretary-General Guterres is hoping international support will help make PNH more effective and Haiti’s permanent representative approved of Guterres’ report on the topic. Part of the article is below. Read the full text here. U.N. Security Council supports replacing Haiti peacekeepers with smaller mission Jacqueline Charles, Miami Herald April 11, 2017 The United Nations’ Security Council is welcoming a call by Secretary-General António Guterres to move to […]

The Shared Struggle of African Americans and Haitians

In this video, Congresswoman Maxine Waters, former chair of the Congressional Black Caucus and the senior African American woman serving in Congress; and Mildred T. Aristide, attorney and former First Lady of Haiti, discuss historical and contemporary matters that relate to African American and Haitian progress at Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit, MI. April 6, 2017

Lettre Ouverte a la Police Nationale d’Haïti sur les droits de manifester | Open Letter to Haitian National Police RE Right to Protest

(The English translation of this letter is below.) BUREAU DES AVOCATS INTERNATIONAUX 3, 2ème rue Lavaud B.P. 19048 Port-au-Prince, Haïti Tel : +5092943-2106/ 07 Email: avokahaiti@aol.com   LETTRE OUVERTE   Port-au-Prince, le 28 Mars 2017 Monsieur Michel-Ange Gédéon Directeur Général de la Police Nationale d’Haïti (PNH) En ses bureaux.-   Monsieur le Directeur Général, Le Bureau des Avocats Internationaux (BAI), dans sa mission première de défendre les droits des plus démunis, les droits inaliénables, imprescriptibles et inhérents à la personne humaine, en particulier ceux des victimes du choléra importé par la MINUSTAH, des femmes victimes de viol, d’agression sexuelles et autres abus de droit, prend acte du refus systématique de la Police Nationale d’Haïti (PNH) dont vous êtes son Directeur Général de donner suite aux notifications des organisations de Victimes de choléra, du Bureau des Avocats Internationaux (BAI) et du […]

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