Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti

Rethinking methods for effective aid and partnerships in Haiti

Following Hurricane Matthew’s destruction, there has been much conversation about how NGOs and outside groups can give effective aid. In the article below, Devex explains a strategy for giving specific, and therefore effective, aid to Haitians on the ground, and the importance in building a relationship with Haitian institutions. Part of the article is below. Click HERE for the full text. Q&A: Rethinking effective aid and partnerships in Haiti Amy Lieberman, Devex November 16, 2016   American Jewish World Service is giving $800,000 to Haiti this year, on a “slow and steady spend-down” from its annual $2 million funding level in 2010 that followed the devastating earthquake that hit that year. The international nonprofit supports 450 local human rights and poverty-fighting groups worldwide with a unique funding approach that is deliberately light on direct oversight, says Amber Lynn Munger, an AJWS senior […]

Major Food Crisis after Hurricane Matthew-Jocelerme Privert

Interim President Jocelerme Privert, Haiti, asks the international community to work together to raise funds for the most vulnerable victims of Hurricane Matthew. The government of Haiti estimates 1.5 million people need immediate assistance, including more than 140,000 people who are living in temporary shelters. “I don’t want Haitian citizens to die because of the inability of international assistance,” Privert said. Read the full article from The Independent below. Haiti faces ‘major food crisis’ after Hurricane Matthew and needs more global donations, says interim president Gabriel Samuels, The Independent November 11th, 2016 Jocelerme Privert makes impassioned plea for more fundraising from abroad Haiti is facing a “major food crisis” and the international community is falling short of helping it to recover from Hurricane Matthew, the country’s interim president has said. Jocelerme Privert said Haitians were suffering from higher levels of malnutrition and were unable to take […]

Questions over funding source for UN cholera compensation plan

Supporters of cholera accountability in Haiti were given good news recently, as the UN announced its plan to treat, eliminate, and compensate for cholera in Haiti. While this announcement has been deemed a big step in the right direction by many, major questions persist over where this proposed $400 million will come from. Part of the article is below. Click HERE for the full text. UN Approves Haiti Cholera Compensation Plan. But Who Will Actually Pay for It? Mark Leon Goldberg, UN Dispatch October 26, 2016   The United Nations has agreed to compensate the victims of Haiti’s cholera outbreak as part of a $400 million aid package that also includes the goal of eradicating cholera from the country. The decision comes six years after Nepalese UN Peacekeepers likely introduced a deadly cholera strain to the country through improper sanitation practices at […]

UN considers paying $400 million in compensation for Haiti cholera outbreak

Though the UN has announced its $400 million proposal to eradicate, treat, and compensate for cholera in Haiti, it is still denying legal accountability or responsibility. Rather, the UN has declared that it is acting out of a “moral responsibility,” and views the compensation package as “an important sign of solidarity” with those who were affected by the epidemic. While it is unclear whether this plan will ever be carried out, or even reach full funding, the UN remains clear that, at least for the immediate future, it is not changing its legal position. Linked To Haiti Cholera Outbreak, U.N. Considers Paying Millions In Compensation Jason Beaubien, NPR October 25, 2016   For years, the United Nations has refused to publicly acknowledge that its troops were the source of a massive cholera outbreak in Haiti in the wake of the 2010 […]

Push-back against UN-like organizations after Matthew

After Hurricane Matthew, there has been increased conversation around where people should donate to. Many Haitians have a severe mistrust of the UN after its accidentally introduced cholera in 2010 as well as the Red Cross after a report detailing corruption in donation funds after the earthquake were released earlier this year. IJDH’s Nicole Phillips explains that, post-hurricane, there is a big need for Haiti to shift out of a culture of dependency on international organizations. Part of the article is below. Click HERE for the full text. Why the United Nations is facing push-back as it tries to help Haiti Zhai Yun Tan, The Christian Science Monitor October 14, 2016   Tensions are high in Haiti after the country was hit by category 4 hurricane Matthew last week, as thousands continue to seek aid amid collapsed homes and infrastructure. The […]

American Red Cross donations and local organizations

After the 2010 earthquake, many donors were pained to learn how little of their contributions actually went to Haiti. The American Red Cross was a prime example, according to an investigation by ProPublica and NPR. “The reputation of the Red Cross in Haiti is very negative,” Nicole Phillips of IJDH said. In the same way consumers “shop local,” the solution is to give local. Rather than donating to foreign NGOs with high overhead costs to help Haitians after Hurricane Matthew, Edwidge Danticat and others advocate for organizations based in Haiti. Nicole Phillips, who lives in Haiti, said, “By giving money directly to the Haitian network, you’re cutting out a huge sum of cost that otherwise would have to pay for the middleman, for plane tickets, accommodations, et cetera  — it’s going directly to Haitians.” Local organizations, and NGOs with a proven track record, are […]

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Institute for Justice & Democracy In Haiti
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