Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti

How can Haiti regain its independence?

Though Haiti gained its independence in 1804, one can argue that Haiti began to lose that independence less than two decades later when it was forced to start paying France back for lost slaves and property. Almost immediately after Haiti finished paying that “debt” in 80 years, the U.S. military occupied the country for 19 years. Haitian leaders also took advantage of the insecurity, sometimes with the help of foreign countries. This author argues that the only way Haiti can regain its independence is to rid itself of the constant foreign help and take matters into its own hands. Part of the article is below. Click HERE for the full text. Only Haitians can save Haiti Joel Dreyfuss, The Washington Post August 24, 2016 Joel Dreyfuss is a Washington Post Global Opinions contributing columnist. Haiti won a rare victory on […]

PIH Asks USDA Not to Dump Peanuts in Haiti

A few weeks ago, the US Department of Agriculture announced a new plan to send 500 metric tons of US peanuts to Haiti to help with Haiti’s hunger crisis. The problem with this plan is that Haitians already grow their own peanuts and have a large peanut industry. In the past, US products like rice have undercut the Haitian market and left Haitian farmers unable to sell their crops and feed their families. Partners in Health has joined calls for the USDA to drop this plan and find a better way to help Haiti. Part of the post is below. Click HERE for the full text. No to ‘Dumping’ Peanuts in Haiti Partners in Health April 29, 2016 A statement from Partners In Health: The U.S. Department of Agriculture recently announced a deal to ship 500 metric tons of peanuts grown in […]

International Community Pushes Haitian Elections By Reducing Aid

At a time when Haitians are particularly vulnerable due to a drought and ensuing food shortages, the international community is withholding aid and donations. Throughout the electoral process, international actors have been urging Haiti to hold elections as soon as possible, despite rampant fraud and other problems with the elections. Now that Haiti has a transitional government which is set to end on May 14, the international community is upping the pressure to hold elections, even though many Haitians are calling for a verification of the previous rounds. As one Haiti expert puts it, “International assistance has always been ‘political,’ so this is not really new. Dependent countries like Haiti have very limited room to maneuver; their sovereignty is always at bay.” Part of the article is below. Click HERE for the full text. As Haiti Political Crisis Deepens, International […]

Martelly’s Presidential Candidate Seized Land from Peasants

Jovenel Moïse, the alleged presidential frontrunner in Haiti’s fraud-filled elections, is widely known as “the Banana Man” for his work with an exporter called Agritrans before he joined the race. Interviews with peasants living in the area where Agritrans is located reveal that the Banana Man didn’t have the positive impact that he claims. Many of these peasants have been kicked off the land by Agritrans and lost their livelihoods. Some remain homeless and without the jobs that Agritrans promised it would create. Many fear that if Moïse becomes president, the situation for peasants will get even worse. Part of the article is below. Click HERE for the full text. Haiti’s Fraudulent Presidential Frontrunner Seizes Land for His Own Banana Republic Beverly Bell, Other Worlds January 21, 2016 The only man running in Haiti’s fraudulent presidential election run-offs on January 24, […]

Threats to Peasants’ Land Rights in Haiti

Below is the second piece in Other Worlds’ Haitian land rights series, featuring an interview with Ricot Jean-Pierre. Jean-Pierre discusses how inequitable control of land has devastated the vast majority throughout Haitian history, from enslavement to today. Part of the article is below. Click HERE for the full text. The Blood of the Earth: Agriculture, Land Rights, and Haitian History Beverly Bell, Other Worlds January 13, 2016 Yesterday, January 12, on the sixth anniversary of the 7.0 earthquake, Haitians mourned the countless lives lost. Among the many aftershocks they face is disaster capitalism, in which the Haitian elite and foreign corporations – backed by the US  government, World Bank, and Inter-American Development Bank – are grabbing lands for extraction and mega-development projects. Ricot Jean-Pierre, social worker and program director of the Platform to Advocate Alternative Development in Haiti (PAPDA), tells how inequitable control of […]

Land Exploitation and the Resistance to It in Haiti

As an impoverished nation so close to U.S. shores, Haiti is at particular risk of becoming a target for business and extraction interests that may not align with respect for Haitian rights, especially land rights. This article outlines the ways businesses may take advantage of Haitians, and what is being done to resist these efforts. It is part of a new series on land rights and food sovereignty in Haiti. Part of the article is below. Click HERE for the full text. “The Struggle for Land Justice Knows No Borders”: Corporate Pillaging in Haiti Natalie Miller, Other Worlds December 22, 2015 Since the earthquake of January, 2010, Haiti has increasingly become a target of extraction and private business development by Haitian and foreign investors. Income and trade – if the wages are livable and the trade is fair – would, of course, be helpful […]

Contact IJDH

Institute for Justice & Democracy In Haiti
15 Newbury Street
Boston, MA 02116

Telephone: (617) 652-0876
General Inquiries:
Media Inquiries: