Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti

Mass Funeral for Haitians Who Died from Deplorable Prison Conditions

This article describes the scene at and context for a mass funeral the Port-au-Prince chief prosecutor put on for people who died at the National Penitentiary. Already known for the worst overcrowding in the world, Haiti’s prisons are facing even more of a hunger and malnutrition crisis lately. The majority of the prisoners have never been seen by a judge, including most of the ones in the mass funeral. Haiti’s government has a responsibility to offer basic services to its prisoners, and the problem of pre-trial detention urgently needs to be addressed. Mass funeral held for 20 Haitians who died in dismal prison David McFadden, ABC News February 21, 2017 Relatives wailed in grief or stared stoically as flowers were placed on 20 caskets at a mass funeral for the latest group of inmates who died miserably in Haiti’s largest prison, […]

Pretrial Detention and Malnutrition in Haiti’s Prisons

Haiti’s prisons are the most crowded in the world, with 454% occupancy. This leads to many kinds of preventable diseases, as well as malnutrition from the strain on resources at the prisons. Malnutrition has become even more of a problem recently, as Haiti faces a food shortage. Many of the inmates have not been before a judge yet: Pretrial detention is a rampant problem in Haiti’s justice system. As IJDH Director Brian Concannon describes, there is not much incentive for this to change because even the families of innocent inmates are roped into paying bribes to get their loved ones out of prison. Part of the article is bellow. Click HERE for the full text. AP Exclusive” Malnutrition killing inmates in Haiti jails David McFadden, The Washington Post February 20, 2017 PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — Dozens of emaciated men with sunken […]

Vigilante Justice Used to Bypass a Broken System in Haiti

Vigilante justice is a problem in Haiti but the average citizen often seems either indifferent or approving of these types of lynchings, viewing them as necessity for justice due to the broken justice system. Nicole Phillips, an IJDH Staff Attorney, explains that if the government prioritizes improving the justice system, and if Haitians know how to use the justice system to enforce their rights, this will not be such a problem. UN mission says vigilantes have impunity in Haiti David McFadden, Associated Press, Yahoo! News January 17, 2017 PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP) — A report issued Tuesday by the U.N. stabilization mission in Haiti rebukes local authorities for a losing battle against vigilante violence and displaying passivity or even tolerating mobs taking the law into their own hands. The human rights section of the U.N. mission, known by its French acronym Minustah, said […]

UN Cholera Apology’s a First Step But Much More Needs to Be Done

On December 1 before the General Assembly, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon apologized for the cholera epidemic and detailed a $400 million plan to fight the disease. While the apology is a necessary first step towards justice and something that cholera victims have been demanding for years, the UN was very careful not to imply legal responsibility in the apology. Even the description of the plan was “solidarity” rather than accountability or responsibility. This may be contributing to the trouble the UN is having with getting member states to contribute to the plan. The UN must also make sure to fully consider compensating victims and find strategies to do so. Part of the article is below. Click HERE for the full text. The UN’s Apology Won’t Heal Disease, But It’s A First Step to Justice Beatrice Lindstrom, Opinio Juris January 2, 2017 When […]

There is still time for President Obama to pay the US debt to Haiti

…or rather, begin repaying the debt, which has been imposed on Haiti almost since the country claimed its independence in 1804. The US has long been involved in Haiti in detrimental ways but by redesignating Temporary Protected Status for Haitians, and expanding the Haitian Family Reunification Program, which is currently too limited, President Obama has a chance to begin to make things right. There is still time before he leaves office. Will he heed the calls for justice? Part of the letter is below. Click HERE for the full text. Dear President Obama, while there is time Nancy Young, Medium December 20, 2016 Dear President Obama: I tried to call you yesterday on a matter of great urgency and justice to the people of Haiti and those who love them here in the US. But the White House comments line was […]

Be Part of the Solution for Haiti

Dear Friend, As the holiday celebrations approach, please join the Institute for Justice & Democracy in Haiti (IJDH) and the Bureau des Avocats Internationaux (BAI) in celebrating a year of victories for justice in Haiti. Along with our collaborators in Haiti and abroad, we have made historic and sustainable impact in 2016, including: •The United Nations admitted involvement in bringing cholera to Haiti and announced $400 million to fight cholera and support the cholera victims. This is a big step forward—it will save hundreds of lives and alleviate misery for tens of thousands of families. Smaller victories along the way included: •A series of reports from UN Human Rights experts urging the UN to respect the cholera victims’ human right to compensation; •Letters from 160 Members of the U.S. Congress—Democrats and Republicans—calling on the U.S. State Department to seek a […]

Contact IJDH

Institute for Justice & Democracy In Haiti
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Boston, MA 02116

Telephone: (617) 652-0876
General Inquiries: info@ijdh.org
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