Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti

Hurricane Matthew: An Unnatural Disaster

In the wake of Hurricane Matthew, Haiti has experienced vast amounts of devastation.  However, the disaster that has unfolded is not natural – it has been propagated by decades of marginalization of the Haitian people, and their constant struggle to rise above the economic, social, and political barriers that plague them. Part of the article is below.  Click HERE to read the full article. Chronicle of a disaster foretold Laura Wagner, Medium – Duke University October 24, 2016 On Monday, October 3, my friend Claudine St. Fleur’s father was supposed to send her provisions from Degerme, their home community in the mountains above Abricots, a town on the far southwest coast of Haiti, west of the larger town of Jérémie. He grows yams, plantains and breadfruit in the fertile red earth abutting their lakou, the traditional Haitian family homestead, and catches fish […]

Why are Haitians still protesting after elections were postponed?

For months, Haitians have been taking to the streets to demand fair and democratic elections. Finally, deeply flawed elections were cancelled two days before the final round was to be held. But Haitians are still taking to the streets. Why? In this blog post, IJDH volunteer Nancy Young explains how foreign interference is still heavy on Haiti’s elections, and is causing Haitians to mistrust the process. Part of the post is below. Click HERE for the full text. Why I didn’t write this story about the democracy protest in Haiti… Nancy Young, Medium February 10, 2016 So, I was sitting down to write this story about the protest in front of the US Embassy in Port-au-Prince. The protesters had gathered, for the third Thursday in a row, to protest foreign interference in Haiti’s electoral process and its democracy. The location, the US […]

Turning Feces into Compost to Improve Haiti’s Sanitation

Haiti has a major sanitation problem which was made even worse in 2010 when United Nations peacekeepers brought cholera to the country. Sustainable Organic Integrated Livelihoods (SOIL) is one group that’s addressing that problem by using dry toilets to make compost for farmers and the families who provide the material for composting (feces). Unfortunately, the other “sanitation” options in Haiti, like open defecation, are free. As IJDH Director Brian Concannon suggests, perhaps the UN could use some of the money it unnecessarily spends on peacekeeping missions to contribute to better sanitation in Haiti. Part of the article is below. Click HERE for the full text. In Haiti, Turning Human Waste to Flowers One program has found a way to turn feces into agricultural compost. Can it help a country with a limited sanitation system? Alexis K. Barnes, Medium January 19, 2016 […]

Contact IJDH

Institute for Justice & Democracy In Haiti
15 Newbury Street
Boston, MA 02116

Telephone: (617) 652-0876
General Inquiries: info@ijdh.org
Media Inquiries: media@ijdh.org

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