Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti

Will Haiti’s Current Fight for Democracy Lead to Real Change?

In this op-ed, famous actor and humanitarian Danny Glover tracks the progress Haiti has made towards democracy during the current, long-delayed election cycle. While voter participation has been declining in Haiti, Haitians took a stand against international interference in the elections that were originally scheduled in 2015. There was so much backlash against that election process that the results were discarded and it was rescheduled to October 9, 2016. Now, Haitians have a chance at truly electing their next leader and pushing for a more progressive government that responds to the needs of Haiti’s poor majority. ——– Haiti’s First Free Elections In Years Hold Promise Of Bold Progressive Change Danny Glover, The World Post September 19, 2016 The United States isn’t the only country in the midst of a drawn out election campaign marked by voter discontent and demands for bold, new policy […]

How can Haiti regain its independence?

Though Haiti gained its independence in 1804, one can argue that Haiti began to lose that independence less than two decades later when it was forced to start paying France back for lost slaves and property. Almost immediately after Haiti finished paying that “debt” in 80 years, the U.S. military occupied the country for 19 years. Haitian leaders also took advantage of the insecurity, sometimes with the help of foreign countries. This author argues that the only way Haiti can regain its independence is to rid itself of the constant foreign help and take matters into its own hands. Part of the article is below. Click HERE for the full text. Only Haitians can save Haiti Joel Dreyfuss, The Washington Post August 24, 2016 Joel Dreyfuss is a Washington Post Global Opinions contributing columnist. Haiti won a rare victory on […]

Plan Proposed for Eradicating Cholera from Haiti

Ever since the United Nations began a cholera epidemic in Haiti in 2010, it has been covering that fact up. Now that the UN has finally admitted its involvement, there are steps it can take to stamp out the disease during Haiti’s dry season, before the wet season exacerbates the problem and cholera can claim more lives. These steps have been drafted by one of the epidemiologists who took the lead on uncovering the source of the epidemic. Will the UN heed the advice? Part of the article is below. Click HERE for the full text. What the UN must do to wipe out cholera in Haiti Ralph R. Frerichs, Boston Globe August 22, 2016 IT IS NOT enough that the United Nations is finally beginning to acknowledge its involvement in the lethal cholera epidemic in Haiti. Now it must urgently do […]

Why is everyone so worried about USDA’s peanut shipment to Haiti?

When the US Department of Agriculture announced a plan to ship surplus US peanuts to Haiti to feed malnourished children, there was an immediate and prolonged backlash. From Haitian farmers to economists to human rights groups in the US, many spoke out urging the USDA to reconsider, especially given the devastating impact US shipments of rice had on Haiti’s rice market and farmers. While the plan may sound generous on the surface, the USDA doesn’t seem to have done any market analysis or sought to make this plan sustainable without interfering with Haitian peanut farmers’ livelihoods. Part of the article is below. Click HERE for the full text. Dumping nuts Raymond C. Offenheiser, The Hill May 11, 2016 It’s a classic case of good intentions gone bad. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) is planning to dump 500 metric tons of […]

Parallels Between Flint and Cholera Outbreak in Haiti

This article reveals the similarities between the two water-induced crises in Flint, Michigan and in Haiti. The author underlines the negligence that led to both crises: the dismissal of proof that water was contaminated by government officials in Flint and the lack of screening of its own agents and later the refusal to take responsibility by the UN. The author later raises the question of health and social justice, as she points out that these water crises have mostly affected already vulnerable populations. Part of the article is below. Click HERE for the full text. Flint and Haiti: A Tale of Two Rivers, a Tale of Two Crimes Victoria Koski-Karell, Truthout February 20, 2015 We made our way down the steep bank to the meandering river, Haiti’s largest: the Artibonite. My friends warned me about the strong currents, and also […]

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